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Îlet Hardy

Islet in Sainte-Anne
  • Hardy islet is an uninhabited islet. It is part of the Islets of Sainte-Anne Natural Reserve, which is the most important nesting site in the Lesser Antilles. It culminates at 13 meters.

  • It is an islet protected because of bird reproduction. Five bird species are present: Sooty Tern, Bridled Tern, Brown Noddy, Audubonet's Shearwater and Red-billed Phaeton. They come to breed there from March to December.

    The network of underground galleries that crosses it allows birds to find prime niches. Its flora is not very diversified but abundant with mangroves and palaetuviums. The presence of cups * serves as a water reserve for the development of vegetation around and inside.

    It...
    It is an islet protected because of bird reproduction. Five bird species are present: Sooty Tern, Bridled Tern, Brown Noddy, Audubonet's Shearwater and Red-billed Phaeton. They come to breed there from March to December.

    The network of underground galleries that crosses it allows birds to find prime niches. Its flora is not very diversified but abundant with mangroves and palaetuviums. The presence of cups * serves as a water reserve for the development of vegetation around and inside.

    It is possible to access the islet by boat thanks to the sandy tongue of the islet. However, it is not an islet dedicated to tourist visits but a space for the protection of migratory birds.

    A bit of culture:

    - Cupule or kamenitzas
    In geomorphology, a cup is a hollow form of dissolution that is found on the generally horizontal surfaces of certain rocks, especially of sedimentary origin such as sandstones and conglomerates. Its shape is generally round, oblong. In karst environments, we talk about kamenitza.

    The cavities are more or less deep. Their very variable dimensions can reach more than one meter in length, then taking the name of basin. Cupules often have a natural weir through which excess water flows.

    A little culture :
    The Îlets de Sainte-Anne National Nature Reserve, created in 1995, was named in co-management with the Martinique Regional Nature Park (PNRM) and the National Forestry Office (ONF). The PNRM ensures its management, preservation and enhancement thanks to a management team (guardians of the environment, curator, etc.).

    Covering an area of ​​5.7 ha, it is made up of the Burgaux, Hardy, Percé and Poirier islets, constituting a major breeding site for pelagic seabirds from the Lesser Antilles as well as a migratory stopover for certain species of birds.
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