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Gueydon Fountain and Bridge

Historic site and monument in Fort-de-France
  • In the middle of the 19th century, facing the serious problems of drinking water supply in the town of Fort-de-France, Admiral Gueydon, Governor of Martinique at the time, undertook the construction of a water tower which he entrusted to the miners and prisoners. Construction took 22 months.

  • Thus, Gueydon diverts the course of the river Case-Navire from the heights of Didier to meet the water needs of the population of Fort de France. Monumental fountain, built in the shape of a basin, surmounted by a semicircular vault, from which cascades a large water body that falls into a funnel-shaped basin to which are fitted the pipes distributing water to the various districts of the city. It first sank on July 13, 1856, discharging the captured water.

    The fountain stopped supplying...
    Thus, Gueydon diverts the course of the river Case-Navire from the heights of Didier to meet the water needs of the population of Fort de France. Monumental fountain, built in the shape of a basin, surmounted by a semicircular vault, from which cascades a large water body that falls into a funnel-shaped basin to which are fitted the pipes distributing water to the various districts of the city. It first sank on July 13, 1856, discharging the captured water.

    The fountain stopped supplying households in the 1900s, in favour of modern distribution networks. However, despite the erosion, it has kept its superb and offers a magnificent view of Antoine Siger Street, from the Gueydon Bridge to Liberté Street. Nostalgic people would like to see the water spring up again.

    Today the fountain constitutes an important element of the historical, architectural and cultural heritage of the city, inscribed on the list of tourist sites in Martinique.
    An enhancement operation therefore aims both to accompany and support tourist activities, but also to promote the renewal of the urban landscape.
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